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Last Seven Days

Answer

Yes, that's fine.


Answer

Capitalize it. Here's the entry:


Earth 


Capitalize when used as the proper name of the planet, lowercase for other uses. The astronauts returned to Earth. He hopes to move heaven and earth. She is down-to-earth. The moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the only total lunar eclipse this year.
See planets.


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You could use AP style, which is gray:

gray  Not grey. But: greyhound. 

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No. The period always goes inside the quotation marks in AP style.


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No, it's correct. See the first sentence of the section in question:

If a paragraph does not start with quotation marks but ends with a quotation that is continued in the next paragraph, do not use close-quote marks at the end of the introductory paragraph if the quoted material constitutes a full sentence. Use close-quote marks, however, if the quoted material does not constitute a full sentence. For example:
He said, "I am shocked and horrified by the slaying.
"I am so horrified, in fact, that I will ask for the death penalty."
But: He said he was "shocked and horrified by the slaying."
"I am so horrified, in fact, that I will ask for the death penalty," he said.


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I don't think quotation marks are necessary. The meaning is clear without them. On another point, AP style doesn't use the Oxford comma in simple series such as these:

Some of the negative age-related words that Levy used in her study include decline, dependent, dementia and dying, while the positive ones included guidance, wise, insightful and enlightened. 

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We'd avoid such constructions. How about just: Joe Smith, the show's director, writer and producer, created ...


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We don't have an overall rule; it varies depending on the measurement and common usage.

Answer

We'll take a look at it. Thanks for noting it.


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No; generally lowercase. Also, we don't use a parenthetical abbreviations and acronyms. If the shorthand is clear on second reference, just use it on second reference. Here is the full entry.

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You're correct, generally speaking. But I can't quite figure out the logic in the groupings of cars and bikes vs. planes and trains. The first set travels on roadways and the second set doesn't? Maybe, but that's pretty obscure unless it's clear in the context.

The from A to B and C could be correct if A is one class of things and B and C are another class:  from apples to ham and steak. Or if B and C are often thought of as combined: from apples to meat and potatoes (ham and cheese, peanut butter and jelly). 


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No hyphen there.


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I'd use the guidelines in this entry:

events 


Titles of special events, such as art exhibits and touring displays, are enclosed in quotes with primary words capitalized: “Mummies: New Secrets From the Tombs” at Chicago’s Field Museum. Names of annually recurring events are capitalized without quotes: North American International Auto Show in Detroit; Calgary Stampede


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That's the style that's been in place for decades, so I can't speak with 100% certainty about the reasoning. I believe, though, that was adopted for clarity. Adding an apostrophe in the decades adds no clarity; it just adds an apostrophe. Adding an apostrophe to single letters can, in some cases, enhance clarity and comprehension. A's vs. As. 

We don't use a hyphen with letter combinations.

FIGURES: Add s: The custom began in the 1920s. The airline has two 727s. Temperatures will be in the low 20s. There were five size 7s.
(No apostrophes, an exception to Webster's New World College Dictionary guideline under "apostrophe.")
SINGLE LETTERS: Use 's: Mind your p's and q's. He learned the three R's and brought home a report card with four A's and two B's. The Oakland A's won the pennant.
MULTIPLE LETTERS: Add s: She knows her ABCs. I gave him five IOUs. Four VIPs were there.


Answer

Here's the guidance, which applies to headlines as well as regular text:

The dash, the semicolon, the colon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only. They go outside when they apply to the whole sentence.

So, outside the quotation mark in this case.

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It's premier in that sense.


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It's the latter, the same as for pan sizes.

From the hyphen entry:

SUSPENSIVE HYPHENATION: Use these forms to shorten a compound modifier or a noun phrase that shares a common word:
When the elements are joined by and or or, expressing more than one element: 10-, 15- or 20-minute intervals; 5- and 6-year-olds. But: The intervals are 10, 15 or 20 minutes; the children are 5 to 6 years old.
When the elements are joined by to or by, expressing a single element: a 10-to-15-year prison term; an 8-by-12-inch pan. But: The prison term is 10 to 15 years; the pan is 8 by 12 inches.

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The comma there is optional. It adds a bit of a pause to the sentence, and thus lends some emphasis to before anyone else.

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If you're writing for people in the industry who know the term (which I imagine you are), then no hyphens are needed. If the audience is more general (say, for instance, an airline magazine), I'd use hyphens and explain the term. My mom would be perplexed if you didn't.

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It's fine as you have it.

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We lowercase them.


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We'd write it this way: Use the "track changes" feature.


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Yes, hyphenate that.

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We use the article, but local usage sometimes differs.

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Yes, we call it Nur-Sultan.

Featured Tip


From the Pronunciation Guide

Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)

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From the Topical Guides

2019 Back-to-School Topical Guide

The Associated Press has compiled a style guide of essential words, phrases and definitions related to the return to classes. Terms are from the AP Stylebook, usage in AP stories and Webster's New...


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