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Last Seven Days

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It should be a semicolon or a period, but not a comma.  In your question, there should be a comma after correct

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It's best to be as precise as possible in such phrasing. 

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–The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.
–The dash, the semicolon, the colon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only. They go outside when they apply to the whole sentence.

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Is. Also note: 


 compose, comprise, constitute 

Compose means to create or put together. It commonly is used in both the active and passive voices: She composed a song. The United States is composed of 50 states. The zoo is composed of many animals.
Comprise means to contain, to include all or embrace. It is best used only in the active voice, followed by a direct object: The United States comprises 50 states. The jury comprises five men and seven women. The zoo comprises many animals.
Constitute, in the sense of form or make up, may be the best word if neither compose nor comprise seems to fit: Fifty states constitute the United States. Five men and seven women constitute the jury. A collection of animals can constitute a zoo.
Use include when what follows is only part of the total: The price includes breakfast. The zoo includes lions and tigers.

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Certainly "thrown out by the judge" is more casual than "dismissed by the judge." You'd have to (yes) judge what's appropriate for your specific audience or style of writing. AP would stick with "dismissed." As for the redundancy question, just make sure the circumstances are clear from the context. In many cases, particularly when you're already referring to the judge, "dismissed" may be all you need. For instance, you might logically follow up the statement "the case was dismissed" with an explanation from Judge XYZ about why she took that action.

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Use the full name for one individual award: Bronze Star Medal, Silver Star Medal. But the plural: Bronze Star medals, Silver Star medals.


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Usage is evolving and style isn't settled yet. At this time we variously use the Me Too movement, the "Me Too" movement and the #MeToo movement. In all cases, movement is lowercase. 

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Indeed, there's some confusion about this. Our dictionary recommends hyphenating mega- as a combining form; AP style general guidance is NOT to hyphenate most prefixes. I'd stick with our general rule (no hyphen). 

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As you surmise, there's not a good way to write that out. We'd recommend paraphrasing rather than using the exact quote, especially because quotes should be reserved for those quotes that truly are the best way to say something. Usually, a paraphrase is clearer and more concise.


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We'd spell out those references. 

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I'm not sure exactly what semiregular might mean. You might want to be more specific. But stylistically, we'd make it semiregular, per this entry:


 semi- 

The rules in prefixes apply, but in general, no hyphen.
Some examples:
semifinal | semiofficial
semi-invalid | semitropical
But semi-automatic, semi-autonomous.

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I'd defer to Webster's and use photo-op.

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There are no firm rules for this; it's more a matter of common usage and how it evolves. Note that AP would avoid use of unfamiliar abbreviations and acronyms. If it's familiar to your audience, there probably are usage examples that you can find by others who have encountered the same question for this particular acronym.

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We do have an entry that addresses just that question. You may want to use the on in this case to avoid the appearance that July 5 is being begun. It could be argued either way with this particular example.

Here's the entry:
on 
 Do not use on before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion, except at the beginning of a sentence: The meeting will be held Monday. He will be inaugurated Jan. 20. On Sept. 3, the committee will meet to discuss the issue.
Use on to avoid an awkward juxtaposition of a date and a proper name: John met Mary on Monday. He told Obama on Thursday that the bill was doomed.
Use on also to avoid any suggestion that a date is the object of a transitive verb: The House killed on Tuesday a bid to raise taxes. The Senate postponed on Wednesday its consideration of a bill to reduce import duties.

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We don't use the term; we'd spell out screen capture or say screenshot. NOTE: I see that a previous editor preferred screen shot as two words. This editor, however, would stick with our dictionary spelling, which is screenshot.

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We'd lowercase it as a generic term. 

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We consider asks when used as a noun an unfortunate bit of jargon that should be avoided. This entry discusses such language. 

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We don't hyphenate any of those -wide constructions. Here's the entry:

-wide   No hyphen. Some examples: citywide nationwide continentwide statewide countrywide worldwide industrywide 

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It comes up so rarely that we don't have a style for that. It's also not in the dictionary. I would suggest rephrasing, of course. 

Question from Overland Park, KS on Jan 18, 2018

Is URL acceptable on first use?

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Yes, URL is acceptable on all references. 

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AP doesn't use those symbols in our stories.

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We'd use season one as of this writing. We're also looking at the broader question of sequential designations, and may have changes in the future.


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As with other collective nouns, it depends on the sense of the sentence. Is the wildlife being considered as a group, or as individual bits? Generally, you'll be fine if you use a singular verb. If it sounds odd given the context of the entire sentence, then go with the plural verb. 

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No need for a comma with short phrases such as this.

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That's not covered in AP style. But I think a slash is better than a hyphen, to indicate that they are, in fact, different names rather than one hyphenated name. 

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