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Last Seven Days

Answer

We lowercase it in all uses; same with the words city and county. But you can have a house style that uses uppercase for all of those, if that works better for you.

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Do you need the word color at all? I don't think so. If you do need it, use the hyphen.

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We don't have a specific style. I'd either hyphenate or make it one word. We do use cardholder and bondholder, so following that style it's badgeholder. But ... in this case I think it's clearer and easier to read as badge-holder. 


Answer

Sharp eye! We will take a look at rewording parts of entry. Certainly the intent and the actual practice is Bushes, not Bushs. But you are correct that, upon a close read, that part of the entry is confusing at best.


Question from Mercer Island, WA on June 30, 2020

Which is correct: "Didn't use  to"  or   "Didn't used to?"   

Answer

I used to go to Mercer Island.
I didn't use to go boating there, though.


Question from Lincoln , NE on June 30, 2020

Does AP have a style for "sign in to" vs. "sign into?"

Answer

We don't have a style. Arguments can be made for both.

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We plan to discuss those questions. We haven't, yet. Everyone involved in these issues is also intensely involved in covering all the news of the world. Time is limited, and these questions are complicated. There are, of course, arguments that avoiding those words, as well as others such as niggardly, is overreacting.


Answer

Yes, that's correct.

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Here's the STEM entry:

STEM 


Acceptable on first reference for science, technology, engineering and math, but spell out the full phrase shortly thereafter.

And here is the academic degrees entry. This doesn't address the  international baccalaureate question, and we wouldn't abbreviate it. But if you want to, use the periods as in the B.A. and M.A. examples.


academic degrees 


If mention of degrees is necessary to establish someone’s credentials, the preferred form is to avoid an abbreviation and use instead a phrase such as: Fatima Kader, who has a doctorate in psychology.
Use an apostrophe in bachelor’s degree, a master’s, etc., but there is no possessive in Bachelor of Arts or Master of Science.
Also: an associate degree (no possessive).
Use such abbreviations as B.A., M.A., LL.D. and Ph.D. only when the need to identify many individuals by degree on first reference would make the preferred form cumbersome. Use these abbreviations only after a full name — never after just a last name.
When used after a name, an academic abbreviation is set off by commas: John Snow, Ph.D., spoke.
Do not precede a name with a courtesy title for an academic degree and follow it with the abbreviation for the degree in the same reference.


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Our style is nonenrolling. Other styles may vary.

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Really, any of those are fine as far as this editor is concerned. I would say that moreover sounds rather pompous, and further just a bit less pompous.

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We don't have a preference.

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Myth-busters.

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I'd capitalize the changing part, too: 
Taxation Summit: Accounting in the Time of Pencils

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We wouldn't capitalize them in the text. But if it makes more sense in your organization to do so, then that's fine. It's a purely stylistic choice; there's no right or wrong.

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I think either is fine. Someone could have one insight on Situation A, another insight on Situation and another on Situation C, and thus would have plural insights. But the singular word could also cover all three. Your choice!

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No quote marks. Just Roe v. Wade or Obergefell v. Hodges.

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I've never seen such a section in the Stylebook. Perhaps it was a custom entry in your organization? We have a number of entries covering various elements. but not one all-encompassing entry.

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Yes.

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We don't have a style for listing sources.

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It's a 30-to-40-minute delay. Here's the section of the hyphen entry:

SUSPENSIVE HYPHENATION: Use these forms to shorten a compound modifier or a noun phrase that shares a common word:
When the elements are joined by and or or, expressing more than one element: 10-, 15- or 20-minute intervals; 5- and 6-year-olds. But: The intervals are 10, 15 or 20 minutes; the children are 5 to 6 years old.
When the elements are joined by to or by, expressing a single element: a 10-to-15-year prison term; an 8-by-12-inch pan. But: The prison term is 10 to 15 years; the pan is 8 by 12 inches.

Answer

Our style is anti-racism, following the anti- entry:

anti- 


Hyphenate all except the following words, which have specific meanings of their own (and this is followed by a list that does not include the one in question):


Answer

Thanks for pointing this out. It's part of a broader issue that we have wrestled with, and haven't reached a conclusion. Like many issues of style, it's not nearly as easy as it may look.

Answer

The hyphens are correct.

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