Ask the Editor

Last Seven Days

Answer

I think it's just fine without the hyphen.

Answer

A million doses.

Answer

Here's the entry:


academic departments 


Use lowercase except for words that are proper nouns or adjectives: the department of history, the history department, the department of English, the English department, or when department is part of the official and formal name: University of Connecticut Department of Economics.


Answer

Correct. It's preemergence.

Answer

Vasquez's training.

Question from Durham, North Carolina, on Dec. 01, 2020

Is it Duke University Campus trees or Duke University campus trees?

Answer

Duke University campus trees.

Answer

Yes, you definitely want a hyphen there. Unless you mean to describe the factories themselves as odd. But a question: Why not give a precise number? Is it 41 factories, or 40, or 43? The modifier 41-odd is a little ... odd. Also, I'd delete the unnecessary located.



Answer

Either is fine.

Answer

Yes, that's correct.


Question from Highland Park, Illinois, on Dec. 01, 2020

When referring to SEO strategies, is the term "keyphrase" or "key phrase"?

Answer

We would use key phrase, two words.

Answer

We'd use lowercase.

Answer

You were hungover this morning. I hope you feel better now.

Answer

The Georgia state Senate.

Answer

We announced in July that we would continue to use the lowercase for white. Here are more details. And here is the full race-related coverage entry.

Answer

The boards of directors from A, B and C.

Answer

Our style is food bank, two words.

Answer

I'd use an. My gut is that most people wouldn't read it or think it as one thousand one hundred. Or, make it a penalty of $1,100.

Answer

I'd hyphenate it.

Answer

I wouldn't use the hyphen there. 

Answer

Our dateline selection entry gives full guidance. In your example, if your reporter is doing all the reporting in Denver and is using a byline, we'd use the Denver dateline and make clear in the lead that the news was in Japan. If the reporter works sometimes in Colorado Springs and that dateline makes more sense for your readers, it's OK to use Colorado Springs as the dateline.


Answer

Styles vary. Our style remains eurobond, lowercase.


Question from El Dorado Hills, California, on Nov. 27, 2020

Should "self storage" be hyphenated?

Answer

Yes, we'd use the hyphen in the modifier: a self-storage unit.


Answer

Our style is health care, two words, in all uses. It's our style. Different organizations often have different styles on many points.

Question from Tokyo, on Nov. 26, 2020

Your stylebook entries state that Britain is "acceptable in all references for Great Britain", that Great Britain "consists of England, Scotland and Wales, but not Northern Ireland", and that the United Kingdom "consists of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

An "Ask the Editor" query from California on Nov. 24, 2014, asks "Which is preferred, Great Britain or United Kingdom. Or are they interchangeable?". You have written "They aren't interchangeable. Great Britain consists of England, Scotland and Wales. For the United Kingdom, add Northern Ireland".

But, in response to an "Ask the Editor" query from Chicago on Nov. 29, 2012, asking whether AP style accepts or prefers Britain over United Kingdom, "even when Britain is technically incorrect", you have written that "Britain is commonly used in such news contexts, and is well-understood, though U.K. is more precise".

While familiar with common use of Britain by various outlets to refer to the country, I have adhered to the guidance in your stylebook entries for many years and used United Kingdom to refer to the country that consists of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. But I am currently being accused of editing according to personal preference rather than AP style because, based on your response to the Chicago editor in 2012, AP has been understood to accept use of Britain to refer to the United Kingdom.

Your stylebook entries seem to state clearly that "Britain" and the "United Kingdom" refer to different things, while your 2012 "Ask the Editor" answer appears to state that they can be used to refer to the same thing. I'm sure you can appreciate how this could cause confusion, so please would you clarify, ideally by amending either your "Ask the Editor" response or your related stylebook entries, or stating clearly that your response here supersedes one or both?

Answer

The current guidance is correct. I have deleted the 2012 response. Thanks for noting it.

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Kyiv

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Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)
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2020 Holiday Style Topical Guide

Spellings and definitions of terms associated with religious and cultural events around the turn of the year. Some are in the AP Stylebook; some are in our primary dictionary, Webster’s New World...


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