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Last Seven Days

Answer

How about this: Hyphenate as a modifer: It's a crazy, upside-down world. No hyphen as an adverb: The world turned upside down.

Question from on Nov. 21, 2019

Is the word "cash" singular or plural?

Answer

Singular. But it's hard to think of an example when it would be followed by a verb. My cash is more readily available than my gold.

Answer

From Webster's New World College Dictionary:

 fast-food  adj. designating or of a type of restaurant specializing in low-cost carryout food (fast food) that is prepared and served quickly.



Answer

It's a job well done.

Here is the relevant section of the hyphen entry:

Hyphenate well- combinations before a noun, but not after: a well-known judge, but the judge is well known.


Answer

As you have it is correct.

Answer

Neither Webster's New World College Dictionary nor Merriam-Webster recognizes it as a verb. So the best advice is: Don't use it as a verb. If you must use it as a verb, I guess the no-hyphen version at least is consistent.

Answer

No hyphen. See this part of the hyphen entry:

Hyphenate well- combinations before a noun, but not after: a well-known judge, but the judge is well known.

Question from on Nov. 20, 2019

How do I write names of battleships

Answer

 the battleship USS Oklahoma, for example.


Question from Cary, NC on Nov. 20, 2019

 A cancer drug, FOLFIRINOX, is a combination of different chemo drugs used to treat pancreatic cancer.
FOL | =
Leucovorin Calcium (Folinic Acid)
F | = Fluorouracil
IRIN | = Irinotecan Hydrochloride
OX | = Oxaliplatin

How should we capitalize and use this acronym properly to avoid awkward construction on first and second reference? 

Answer

First of all, we would try hard to avoid using the term in AP copy. We’d call it a cancer drug combination or chemo drug combination or something like that.
 
But if we must make a call, we should go with folfirinox
 
The Stylebook says: Use only an initial cap and then lowercase for abbreviations and acronyms of more than five letters, unless listed otherwise in this Stylebook or Webster's New World College Dictionary. 
 
But that seems to be more about proper names like Benelux and Delmarva. I worry that if we capitalize Folfirinox, the reader would assume it’s a brand name.
 
It’s not a brand name. And in fact, the constituent parts of the combo aren’t brand names. So this seems more like radar and amphetamine, which we don’t capitalize.


Answer

First of all, we would try hard to avoid using the term in AP copy. We’d call it a cancer drug combination or chemo drug combination or something like that.
 
But if we must make a call, we should go with folfirinox. 
 
The Stylebook says: Use only an initial cap and then lowercase for abbreviations and acronyms of more than five letters, unless listed otherwise in this Stylebook or Webster's New World College Dictionary. 
 
But that seems to be more about proper names like Benelux and Delmarva. I worry that if we capitalize Folfirinox, the reader would assume it’s a brand name.
 
It’s not a brand name. And in fact, the constituent parts of the combo aren’t brand names. So this seems more like radar and amphetamine, which we don’t capitalize.

Answer

Yes, in that context you are absolutely correct. 

Answer

We don't have a particular style for that. Depends on what makes most sense in the context of what you're displaying. Just make sure it's clearly marked, of course!

Question from San Diego, CA on Nov. 19, 2019

Is Satellite with capital "s" or lowercase satellite

Answer

It's lowercase.

Question from Atlanta, GA on Nov. 19, 2019

Hi, is it a FTSE company or an FTSE company?

Answer

If FTSE is pronounced letter by letter, then it's an FTSE company. Similar to an FBI agent.

Answer

It's correct to refer to a groundbreaking project, groundbreaking work, etc.

Answer

Yes, that's the style we typically use for committees that are so widely known by the shorter version of their name.


Answer

Yes, you need to spell out British Columbia.  As for whether you need it, consider your likely audience. Would your readers likely know that British Columbia is a Canadian province? If so, no need to add Canada. Another possibility: Consider whether you need that sentence, as written, at all. Could you provide the location information elsewhere, and then more gracefully work in the tidbit that Dan told his story while sitting at a Vancouver bar?


Answer

We don't have a specific style for that.

Answer

I think that use is fine.

Answer

I'd use less, with the 10 hours being considered a quantity. Fewer wouldn't be wrong, though, if you do consider each hour individually. One of those gray areas.

Question from Austin, TX on Nov. 19, 2019

Question about an answer from yesterday: Lincoln, NE, wrote:
In the headline "Leading farm-ranch employees seminars set at O'Neill, Valentine, North Platte", should employees have an apostrophe, employees'? 
But isn't "employees" modifying "seminars," so as a modifier wouldn't it be singular? "Leading farm-ranch employee seminars ..."? 

Answer

Yes, I do prefer the singular. But the plural isn't wrong. Think farmers market, teachers union, etc.

Answer

I'd make it 3D-printed model.

Answer

Yes, I'd use the hyphen.


Answer

No apostrophe.

DESCRIPTIVE PHRASES: Do not add an apostrophe to a word ending in s when it is used primarily in a descriptive sense: citizens band radio, a Cincinnati Reds infielder, a teachers college, a Teamsters request, a writers guide.
Memory aid: The apostrophe usually is not used if for or by rather than of would be appropriate in the longer form: a radio band for citizens, a college for teachers, a guide for writers, a request by the Teamsters.


Answer

Yes, that stands.

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