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Last Seven Days

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We wouldn't use the tilde. Some readers don't know what it means, for one thing. And yes, some are likely to just ignore it and think you mean 123%, no approximately about it. Why not just use the word? 

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Is, since it's ongoing until this summer, right?

That's unless you want to make a particular point that a lot of work had been done by April. In that case:
The final work was well underway in April and should be completed this summer.

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We don't have a style for that. I'd use uppercase for each word.

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We use a.m. and p.m. for digital as well as print. Our stories are published simutaneously to both print and digital. You could choose to use AM and PM, of course.

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I'd hyphenate it. 

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We deleted the entry. 

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It should be data set. We'll make the change in News Values and Principles. Thanks for noting it.

Question from Texas, on May 18, 2022

Is it a "2-day outage" or "two-day outage"?

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A two-day outage, in our style.

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I would much rather read for roughly 48 hours (more conversational) than for roughly a 48-hour period (very stilted).

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Could you give me some examples?

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As far as I know, we've never used numerals for grades nine and under in references such as second grade or fourth grader. (The 1977 Stylebook, for example, uses words rather than numerals for grades nine and under.)

We don't have a specific style on K-8 or K-6, but I agree that's the better choice (using the numeral) and is in line with other numeral/letter combinations such as 3D.

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The on isn't necessary. Here's the entry:

on 


Do not use on before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion, except at the beginning of a sentence: The meeting will be held Monday. He will be inaugurated Jan. 20. On Sept. 3, the committee will meet to discuss the issue.
Use on to avoid an awkward juxtaposition of a date and a proper name: John met Mary on Monday. He told Biden on Thursday that the bill was doomed.

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One word: roadwork.

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I'd use the former. There could be arguments for the latter, but it could look odd to regular readers who aren't familiar with certain style intricacies.

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Definitely is, since or is the connector and what follows takes a singular verb.
But:
Making, keeping and breaking promises are part of daily human interactions.

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That's a messy one! We'd try to avoid such situations, though I agree that this is a good quote and a catchy headline.

Maybe redo it along these lines: Like 'Lord of the Flies'? Bettendorf staff says middle school is out of control

Otherwise, there's not a good way to do the punctuation.

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Yes, that's fine as written.

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We don't use quote marks with model names.

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I think either could be used. Depends on if you look at it as one bulk suggestion (as it were), or a series of individual "suggestions." I'd use the singular, as written. But I can see your argument.

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We don't have an entry (yet) in the Stylebook itself, but that's guidance issued to AP staff by AP's standards editor. I posted it on our social media. 


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The first one is correct. AP staffers sometimes make mistakes or don't know every point of style.

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On second reference, Census Bureau or the bureau. Not Census standing alone.

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See this section of the quotation marks entry.

PLACEMENT WITH OTHER PUNCTUATION: Follow these long-established printers' rules:
The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.
The dash, the semicolon, the colon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only. They go outside when they apply to the whole sentence.

Elaboration from the exclamation point entry:

PLACEMENT WITH QUOTES: Place the mark inside quotation marks when it is part of the quoted material: "How wonderful!" he exclaimed. "Never!" she shouted.
Place the mark outside quotation marks when it is not part of the quoted material: I hated reading Spenser's "Faerie Queene"!

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Webster's New World College Dictionary (our primary dictionary) lists carry-on as a noun (in addition to as an adjective). I concur. Regular people use it as a noun all the time.


car•ry-on 

(kar´ēän´)

adj. designating lightweight luggage designed to be carried onto an airplane by a passenger, esp. if small enough to fit under an airplane seat or in an overhead compartment —n. such a piece of luggage

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No hyphen in near term in that usage. For consistency, you might rephrase slightly to say ... mitigate downside risk in the longer term.

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