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Last Seven Days

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Yes, we'd use the hyphen, for the reason you give.

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There no doubt are varying viewpoints on this. I'd make it opt in to the service, since the phrase typically is opt in. Also opting in to the service.

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Use the singular verb, indicates. Here's the entry:

data 


The word typically takes singular verbs and pronouns when writing for general audiences and in data journalism contexts: The data is sound. In scientific and academic writing, plural verbs and pronouns are preferred.
Use databank and database, but data processing (n. and adj.) and data center.


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AP style is to NOT put abbreviations in parentheses. We would simply spell out the term and then, if the audience is familiar with the shorthand, use it on second reference.

So we'd write:  In a fast-paced market, mergers and acquisitions are the fastest path to growth. 

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Either is fine.


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Plural in that usage. But: a half hour was all she had.


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Spell it out: tens of millions.

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No hyphen in that use. But hyphenate it it as a modifier: an in-person demonstration.

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This is one for which there's no definitive answer. Webster's New World College Dictionary prefers lowercase, but notes that it's often capitalized. So you're right either way. I'd go with lowercase in keeping with our preference not to use excessive capitalization. I've deleted the answer referring to the Golden Rule.

From Webster's New World College Dictionary:

golden rule 


, the [often G- R-] the precept that one should behave toward others as one would want others to behave toward oneself: see Matt. 7:12; Luke 6:31


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It's an awkward phrase when used as a compound modifier. If you must use it, it definitely needs hyphens: The five-years-in-the-making project. But better: The pilot project, five years in the making, will enable ...

See these parts of the hyphen entry:

If the sheer number of hyphens in a phrase, or confusion about how to use them, can daunt either the writer or the reader, try rephrasing. It’s a guide about how to use hyphens wisely, not it’s a how-to-use-hyphens-wisely guide.

Generally, use a hyphen in modifiers of three or more words: a know-it-all attitude, black-and-white photography, a sink-or-swim moment, a win-at-all-costs approach. Consider carefully, though, before deciding to use more than three modifiers.


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We don't have specific guidance on that. But grammatically, use either a period or a semicolon. Or parentheses. Not a comma. 

Any of these works. Just choose which you prefer and then keep it consistent. 

The effect of residential real estate construction on the state economy is notable, with a total impact of $13.6 billion in earnings. See table 2.
The effect of residential real estate construction on the state economy is notable, with a total impact of $13.6 billion in earnings; see table 2.
The effect of residential real estate construction on the state economy is notable, with a total impact of $13.6 billion in earnings (see table 2).


Question from Carlisle, PA on Oct. 10, 2019

Is it "an AAA bond rating" or "a AAA bond rating"?

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It's a AAA bond rating, since the term is typically pronounced as Triple-A, not A-A-A.

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SDF takes a singular verb. Spell out Syrian Democratic Forces on first reference.

Question from on Oct. 10, 2019

Do I capitalize editorial board?

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We don't capitalize it.

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It should be Ras al-Ayn. Thanks for noting this.


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If you are referring to the official name of a course or academic department, make that clear and capitalize it. If you're referring to a field of study, in general, lowercase it. I am excited to take the Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning class. My undergraduate studies included courses on data structures, object-oriented programming, software engineering, web design and algorithms.


Answer

Binoculars animate on the screen ...

Question from Chicago, IL on Oct. 09, 2019

Should we spell Hofbräuhaus with or without the umlaut?

Answer

Without it, unless it's the name of a person:


accent marks 


Use accent marks or other diacritical marks with names of people who request them or are widely known to use them, or if quoting directly in a language that uses them: An officer spotted him and asked a question: “Cómo estás?” How are you? Otherwise, do not use these marks in English-language stories. Note: Many AP customers’ computer systems ingest via the ANPA standard and will not receive diacritical marks published by the AP.


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Either is fine. 

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It depends on what you mean. Is it two separate things – negotiating being one of them, and contracting efficiency the other? In that case, make it are. Or do you mean efficiency in both negotiating and contracting? In that case, make it is.

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These are case-by-case decisions. They're based partly on how much a part of the common vernacular a phrase has become. There's no one rule.

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It should be Ironman. I've deleted the answer referring to two words. Thanks.

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Different editors have different judgments. As with so many hyphenation questions, it's a matter of judgment and style sense. Either is fine, really. I'd use the hyphen.


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You don't need to include the word degree

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Use the not only ... but also construction:

Nevadans not only rely on public water systems to provide safe, reliable drinking water, but they also expect excellent service and low water rates.


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