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Last Seven Days

Answer

That's one of the debatable ones. Merriam-Webster lists class action as a noun (or noun phrase), along the lines of parking lot, real estate, etc.
It's certainly understandable without the hyphen: a class action lawsuit. That's the version I'd use.
Others prefer more hyphens, and would hyphenate it.
There's no absolute on this one!

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No comma there. 

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That seems fine, especially in the context of a graduation program. 

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That advice (no hyphen in multidevice) is still current. All of the entries on prefixes, which had been listed separately, are now grouped together in one prefixes entry. The entry notes a few changes as we move to Merriam-Webster as our primary dictionary. (Measurement-related prefixes such as centi- and milli- are listed individually in the book.)

Same with all suffixes entries, which are now grouped together in one.

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Capitalize the title of President when it immediately precedes a name. She said she would ask association President Peter Pringle ...
But note the lowercase in this construction: She said she would ask the association president, Peter Pringle, ...

Question from Bloomington, Minnesota, on May 16, 2024

Is it "a historic investment" or "an historic investment"? Thanks! 

Answer

A historic investment. Here's the entry: 

a, an 


Use the article a before consonant sounds: a historic event, a one-year term (sounds as if it begins with a w), a united stand (sounds like you).Use the article an before vowel sounds: an energy crisis, an honorable man (the h is silent), an homage (the h is silent), an NBA record (sounds like it begins with the letter e), an 1890s celebration.

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In the first example, use to if you are writing or speaking directly to the staff. If you are writing or speaking in general about your appreciation and the audience includes people not on the staff, use for. 

In the second example, either is fine.

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I'm not seeing how adding the comma would avoid any confusion. I'm also not not seeing what the confusion might be. On the other hand, I'd say it's perfectly OK as you have it written. Others might object to using the Oxford comma in one short list but not in the other. I say: Flexibility can be good, within reason. 

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Yes, that makes sense for consistency, assuming your audience understands the terms.

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Yup, that's one that's a matter of preference. Either is OK. I'd hyphenate it. I wouldn't argue if you chose not to. As you note, the meaning is clear without the hyphens.

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Yes. The richness ... is present.

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Yes, one word as Merriam-Webster lists each of those.

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No, it's lowercase in that use.

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The form revenue very often can be used for the plural as well as the singular. In your example, I think revenue would work throughout. It's also true, though, that the form revenues with the s can be used to indicate money from more than one distinct source. 

In your example, either form is OK. I'm not sure if that's comforting, or disturbing ...



 


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Five-star hotels ...

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Thank you! I've fixed it. 

Answer

Here's the people of color section of the race-related coverage entry. We don't use people of the global majority, unless in a direct quotation, as the term is not widely used or recognized.

people of color The term is acceptable when necessary in broad references to multiple races other than white: We will hire more people of color. Nine playwrights of color collaborated on the script.
Be aware, however, that many people of various races object to the term for various reasons, including that it lumps together into one monolithic group anyone who isn’t white.
Be specific whenever possible by referring to, for instance, Black Americans, Chinese Americans or members of the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Examples: The poll found that Black and Latino Americans are bearing the brunt of the pandemic’s financial impact, not people of color are bearing the brunt of the pandemic’s financial impact. Most of the magazine’s readers are Black women, not most of the magazine’s readers are women of color.
In some cases, other wording may be appropriate. Examples: people from various racial and ethnic backgrounds; diverse groups; various heritages; different cultures.
Do not use person of color for an individual.
Do not use the term Black, Indigenous and people of color, which some see as more inclusive by distinguishing the experiences of Black and Indigenous people but others see as less inclusive by diminishing the experiences of everyone else. Similarly, do not use the term Black, Asian and minority ethnic.
Do not use the shorthand POC, BIPOC or BAME unless necessary in a direct quotation; when used, explain it.

Answer

As you note, our new primary dictionary, Merriam-Webster, prefers the unhyphenated version: handpicked. We will go with that preference and will delete the hyphenated version from the main section of Stylebook Online. Thanks for noting it.

Answer

Merriam-Webster uses the style sign-off for the noun,  ... formal sign-off by users ...

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We don't have any guidance on that. What you did looks good, but we abbreviate Dec. with the date: Dec. 19, 2023. We also lowercase public hearing.

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That sounds like an excellent alternative.

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In that construction, you actually need commas for the essential phrase: Canada's new prime minister, Justin Trudeau, is sworn in
Or: New Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is sworn in
Justin Trudeau sworn in as Canada's prime minister

Not that this is new news, of course!

Answer

We (and other experts) don't use a comma or capital letter for most partial quotes within a sentence, since they blend into or flow with or are integrated as part of the sentence as a whole.

That said, the combination of three speakers/writers being quoted in one sentence is awfully hard for a reader to handle. I don't know why my predecessors didn't add a cautionary note to that example. But I am going to add one ... sometime, when I have a chance. Thanks for bringing it up.


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