Ask the Editor

Last Seven Days

Answer

My brain and your brain are in accord.

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We need to consult with some folks. It's on the list!

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Either is fine. Webster's New World College Dictionary prefers the one-word version.

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I'd use the quotation marks. It's easier to read that way, for one thing.


Answer

We use lowercase for city in constructions such as that. We recognize that government entities often prefer to capitalize it. If you want to, that's certainly your option. We also lowercase the title mayor when it's not directly before a name. We lowercase members. And we'd spell out the council name on first reference. So, assuming the council's full name is Groveland City Council, our style is:

The city of Groveland is deeply committed to protecting the health and welfare of our residents. The mayor and members of the Groveland City Council have received several emails identical in nature urging the city to take action.

Again, you could choose otherwise.

Here's the capitalization entry.


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We use Southern District and Northern District on later references.

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That's been our style for many years, so I can't speak to the thinking of the editors at the time. We can put it on our list of questions to consider.

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Normally we don't use a hypen with -ly words. But in this case, I'd use it for clarity. If you have to use the quote at all. "a then-newly-out George Smith"

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In that usage, five to 10 times as much ...

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Really, either is fine. I'd use the hyphen.

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Either is fine.

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I don't have strong feelings on this one.

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knows.

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In that example, allows.

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I don't see a problem with it. Seems neutral. But I could be missing something.

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We use two words, as does Webster's New World College Dictionary (our primary dictionary). You can use one if you prefer.

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I can't see how a sentence grammatically could start that way. Or why.


Question from Washington, District of Columbia, on Jan. 24, 2023

Would emigre be published with accent marks? That is, émigré?

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Not in our style. We use accent marks for people's names but nothing else.

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I'd end it with a question mark. I don't know of a firm rule; more a stylistic choice.

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We don't use the term, as it's not recognizable by general audiences. 

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Yes. It doesn't matter where in the series, or in the breakfast, the phrase comes. Use a comma before the final and in your example.

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the Lanesboro and Peterson state fish hatcheries. You can use the general guidance from the rivers entry. Not that it would occur to anyone to check that entry. Perhaps we should do something broader ...

river 


Capitalize as part of a proper name: the Mississippi River.
Lowercase in other uses: the river, the Mississippi and Missouri rivers.


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We don't use the title for a doctor of pharmacy. You could choose to do so.

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Electric car-friendly. See this section of the hyphen entry:

MULTIPLE COMPOUND MODIFIERS: If the phrase is easily recognized without hyphens, use a hyphen only to link last element: They hope to spark consumer interest in department store-based shopping. She said assistant vice president-managed courses should include real estate licensing-related materials. (Again, rephrasing may be a better option.)

Answer

We use Nagorno-Karabakh. 

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