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Last Seven Days

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Either is fine.

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We would go by local usage, and I think that's your domain in this case!

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Here's the guidance for the plurals of numbers. And yes, I'd use the plural form as a descriptor in this sense. So: 18s singles.

FIGURES: Add s: The custom began in the 1920s. The airline has two 727s. Temperatures will be in the low 20s. There were five size 7s.
(No apostrophes, an exception to Webster's New World College Dictionary guideline under "apostrophe.")

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We generally refer to her as Queen Rania. On second reference: Rania.

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Yes.

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No. Lowercase in that use. Uppercase only before a name.

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No change in style. AP staffers don't always get every point right.


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Serif: Freight Text Pro
Sans-serif: Good OT

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It's Chief Warrant Officer 5 before a name. (See the top of the list; the second column is labeled Usage before a name.)

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No. Use the same style as for Indigenous Peoples Day:

Indigenous Peoples Day 


A holiday celebrating the original inhabitants of North America, observed instead of Columbus Day in some U.S. localities. Usually held on the second Monday of October, coinciding with the federal Columbus Day holiday. See Columbus Day.


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 a group of mid-to-late-20th century artists

From the hyphen entry:


SUSPENSIVE HYPHENATION: Use these forms to shorten a compound modifier or a noun phrase that shares a common word:
When the elements are joined by and or or, expressing more than one element: 10-, 15- or 20-minute intervals; 5- and 6-year-olds. But: The intervals are 10, 15 or 20 minutes; the children are 5 to 6 years old.
When the elements are joined by to or by, expressing a single element: a 10-to-15-year prison term; an 8-by-12-inch pan. But: The prison term is 10 to 15 years; the pan is 8 by 12 inches.

Wow! I love your location!!

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We follow our style for anti- and in that style, anti-malarial is hyphenated. Webster's New World College Dictionary chooses not to use the hyphen. Either can be correct. It's a matter of which style you prefer. (I'd say that the hyphen-free version is hard to read ...)

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That's fine.

Question from DETROIT, Michigan, on Sept. 21, 2022

Is it tenant rights, tenants rights or tenants’ rights? 

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It's tenants rights in our style, following this guidance in the possessives entry:

DESCRIPTIVE PHRASES: Do not add an apostrophe to a word ending in s when it is used primarily in a descriptive sense: citizens band radio, a Cincinnati Reds infielder, a teachers college, a Teamsters request, a writers guide.
Memory aid: The apostrophe usually is not used if for or by rather than of would be appropriate in the longer form: a radio band for citizens, a college for teachers, a guide for writers, a request by the Teamsters.
An 's is required, however, when a term involves a plural word that does not end in s: a children's hospital, a people's republic, the Young Men's Christian Association.

Some would argue for tenants' rights. That is a viable option.

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We don't have strong feelings about this one. In general we prefer lowercase to uppercase. But I could see arguments for using uppercase in this case. You're OK either way! 

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Distracting and overbearing, indeed. We feel your pain. And, the whole question of when to use uppercase or lowercase for departments and divisions is more than a bit unsettled. So yes, we'll all need to live with the ambiguity. Much like we do with hyphens ...

Question from Washington, District of Columbia, on Sept. 20, 2022

Hyphen or no hyphen for:

private-sector pension plans

private sector pension plans

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I wouldn't use the hyphen. I think private sector is recognizable as a concept, like real estate or emergency room. But if you prefer, using the hyphen is fine too.


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The first one.

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We don't use citations and thus don't have a style for it.

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That's a hard one. I, too, worked on it for awhile. I tried to think like a consumer (or busy driver) who needs to absorb these details.

Would it work to use some more words and a bit of redundancy? And, significantly, a bulleted list. To me, that makes it more readable. And it could help the user keep track of what's going on.

This also means that you can easily add dates. You'd be repeating the 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. part, but I think it's worth it in this case. (Again, trying to think like a user ...)

The work will be from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.  in the first week of October. Here is the schedule:
  • 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, to 7 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 6.
  • 7 p.m. Thursday,  Oct. 6,  to 7 a.m. Friday, Oct. 7.


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Use the hyphen. You nailed the reason.

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I'd use the hyphen.

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We'd prefer to see the attribution written in. Then you can add the link.

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The former is our style.

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Yes, that's correct.

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